Blackbeard: Power and Popularity

My book, Blackbeard’s Legacy, recounts a fictionalized story of Blackbeard, otherwise known as Edward Thatch or Teach and his power and popularity.. Set in the early 18th century, the book tells about people who knew him, his business, and his eventual conflict with Governor Spotswood of Virginia. Blackbeard, a real person, commanded a fleet of over forty ships at the height of his power. He rivaled the navies of many countries of his day. For example, he blockaded Charleston harbor and lifted that blockade in exchange for a chest of medicines.

Cover, Blackbeard’s Legacy

Blackbeard knew what he was doing. In his business, he visited most major ports on the east coast and corresponded with governors and attorneys-general. Consequently, he had regular customers who paid for the goods he sold. Though he was very powerful, there has never been evidence that he killed anyone.

Under the rules that existed in his time, Blackbeard sometimes operated legally with a royal pardon, and sometimes without the pardon. However, Blackbeard’s power and popularity rested on his position as a sea captain and commander of a large fleet, regardless of legalities.

Blackbeard was, and still is, genuinely popular. For example, he became captain by election by his crew. A powerful and popular commander, seamen wanted to sail with him. Sailing with Blackbeard was safer and more profitable than the alternatives.

Pirates are Popular

Everyone knows Blackbeard as a pirate. Museums up and down the east coast present his story, telling where he lived and how and where he died. The towns of Bath, Beaufort, and Ocracoke in North Carolina are very proud of their connections to Blackbeard. There you can see coves where he anchored and houses in which he supposedly lived.

At a book signing about a year ago, people from North Carolina with family members named Teach came to see me. They claimed to be relatives and descendants of Blackbeard and they were proud of the connection.

Bath Harbor

Why do people enjoy stories about pirates? A very old and rich literature depicts pirates as strong and fiercely independent: they were powerful and popular. They’re described as violent people, maimed in many battles, but surviving them. They have lost eyes and limbs, show deep scars, suffer bad teeth, and wear peg legs. In the literature they prey on women, hide treasure chests, and leave complex coded maps. Little boys visiting the pirate museums love dressing up to the part: they wear eye patches, three-cornered hats, and shout “Aargh!!!” while waving little swords.

Blackbeard’s Use of Power: Reality Check

A pirate, by definition, is a seaman operating outside of the law. During Blackbeard’s day, local governments insisted that ships entering their ports be certified. They required ship operators to obtain licenses or pardons for which they paid. With the pardon, they were privateers; without the pardons, they were considered pirates. Accordingly, local governors collected fees from legal ship operators and shared in their profits.

In the eighteenth century, ships at sea had to fear larger better-armed vessels wherever they went. On the sea, no law enforcement existed. The famous pirates, like Captain Kidd, who were caught and executed for crimes were seized on land surreptitiously, not at sea.

Blackbeard didn’t actually break laws, but conducted his business independently. He never sought the support of bureaucrats and politicians.  When it suited him, he paid for a pardon, but he always decided the course for his business in consultation with his crew and not any public authority.

Blackbeard’s Business

Blackbeard became powerful and popular by succeeding in his business: he delivered goods to virtually every port at prices that people were happy to pay. His success in trade led him to increase the size of his fleet. At sea, he seized many vessels and their crews often chose to continue sailing with him.

When he was assassinated in 1718 by hitmen hired by Governor Spotswood of Virginia, Blackbeard lived in North Carolina and held a legitimate royal pardon. Spotswood never consulted with the governor of North Carolina, disregarded Blackbeard’s pardon, and simply wanted a share of Blackbeard’s wealth. Who was the criminal then?

Have you heard of Spotswood? There’s a Spotsylvania County in Virginia and a golf course in Williamsburg that carries Spotswood’s name. In comparison, when Blackbeard died, he was a king of his day known virtually everywhere, and remains so. Benjamin Franklin in his autobiography writes about writing poems about Teach when he began his newspaper writing career.

Blackbeard’s Popularity: His Flag

Blackbeard’s fleet of ships sailed under Blackbeard’s individual flag, easily recognized by many people in many locations. Today, we would call that marketing, and Blackbeard was clever at self-promotion.

From southeastern Virginia to Charleston there are numerous small museums devoted to Blackbeard. The stories they tell are multiple, and they sell a flag that is supposed to be the one he sailed under:

Blackbeard’s Flag

Does this flag frighten you? The skeleton wears a crown, is shaking something like a large drink in one hand, while his arrow points at a heart that he’s not looking at. He’s also smiling; in fact, the whole skeleton seems to be shaking with laughter. Was Blackbeard a comedian?

Some stories say that Blackbeard had fourteen wives. Others say his only wife was fourteen when they married. Apparently if a tavern maid could claim to be Blackbeard’s wife, that claim was good for business. That may explain why he’s said to have had so many wives!!!

 

Pirates and Law and the Development of Chocolate

 

During the Golden Age of Piracy (the early eighteenth century) royal governors treated pirates as criminals, even though no established law of the seas existed. Pirates operated outside the law, and brought prosperity, and even chocolate. Pirates when caught on land could be held in jail for ransom or executed for crimes against the king’s justice.

Ship owners, to avoid being labeled pirates and hounded by tax collectors, could pay for a charter issued by the king’s bureaucracy. They could then sail their ships for the mother country and pillage whatever other ships they could find. A pirate with a charter complied with the law. He became a privateer, and on the seas he could break all of the laws that existed on land.

Pirate Ships at Work

Pirate Ships at Work

Who Became a Pirate under the Law?

The general public saw through this and didn’t think of pirates as criminals.  If ships brought needed goods to the ports of the new world and sold them at a fair price, the pirates who sailed them became popular. Blackbeard was popular during his lifetime and remains so to this day.

Of course, if pirates didn’t pay the ransom demanded by the law established by royal bureaucrats and governors for their charters, they could sell their goods at a competitive price. They could charge less for the same goods, compared to privateers who paid the price of the charters.

In the early 1700s only people appointed by the established monarchy could become governors and bureaucrats.  Civil service exams didn’t exist. In Virginia, the House of Burgesses exercised power over local taxation, but the bureaucrats in London decided the cost of a ship’s charter for ships crossing the ocean.

Pirates operated outside the law and freely. On the seas they could make their own laws. They elected their captains and adopted a system of sharing the profits from their voyages. In this environment, pirates could enlist whole crews of ships they seized at sea as volunteers. Sailors decided to join pirate fleets for the feeling of freedom and the hopes of sharing in the ship’s profits.

Pirate captains commanded large fleets. For example, historians estimate that Blackbeard commanded a fleet of more than forty ships when he blockaded Charleston harbor in 1718. For more on this, see my book, Blackbeard’s Legacy.

 

Pirates, the Law, Science, and the Development of Chocolate

Not only sailors on rival ships joined pirate fleets. Anyone with a skill that could be used on board a ship could try to join. For example, people who wanted to see the world volunteered. A ship needed navigators, doctors, and a variety of specialists. If a ship operator planned to load agricultural products and foodstuffs, he needed a specialist or botanist to help with the selection, loading and description of the cargo’s uses.

William Hughes, a serious botanist, served on ships that plundered the Caribbean in the 1630s. Hughes was interested in the characteristics of the New World’s plants. A low ranking sailor, he manned a long boat that took sailors to shore during various raids.

Hughes used his opportunities to explore unknown coasts. He met with native peoples and took detailed notes on his discoveries. After he returned to England he published a treatise on New World botany, The American Physitian (1672). In it he included notes on sugarcane which he described as “both pleasant and profitable”.  He described lime as “excellent good against the Scurvie.”

The longest entry in Hughes’ book addressed chocolate which he described as “the American Nectar.” He included a recipe and a long list of potential ingredients. His hot chocolate recipe is discussed by Marissa Nicosia of Cooking in the Archives in the Folger Shakespeare Library’s “First Chefs” exhibition.

 

Pirates and Law: Chocolate is Still with Us

When Hughes sailed, Spain and much of Europe already drank hot chocolate.  Columbus had brought the cacao bean to Europe more than a century earlier. Hot chocolate had already become a popular drink sold from street carts and chocolate houses.

Hughes didn’t say much about his experience as a buccaneer, but returned to his profession as botanist and gardener. He ended his life working at the country estate of a noblewoman, Viscountess Conway.  In his later years, he published a book on grapevines, and later his notes on the New World.

Here is Marissa Nicosia’s plate of ingredients for hot chocolate (cocoa nibs, chopped dark chocolate, cocoa powder, sugar, vanilla, breadcrumbs, chili flakes, and milk):

Ingredients for Hot Chocolate

Jokes about Chocolate

An elderly man lay dying in his bed.

In death’s agony, he suddenly smelled the aroma of his favorite chocolate chip cookies wafting up the stairs.

Gathering his strength, he lifted himself from his bed. He slowly made his way out of the bedroom, and, with even greater effort, forced himself down the stairs, gripping the railing with both hands. With labored breath, he leaned against the door, gazing into the kitchen.

Were it not for death’s agony, he would have thought himself already in heaven: there, spread out on the kitchen table, were hundreds of his favorite chocolate chip cookies.

Mustering one final effort, he threw himself toward the table. His aged and withered hand painstakingly made its way toward a cookie when it was suddenly smacked by a spatula.

“Stay out of those,” said his wife, “they’re for the funeral.”

 

If Bob has thirty chocolate bars, and eats 25, what does he have?

Diabetes.

 

Never eat more chocolate than you can lift.

Privateers and Pirates in the History of Law and Order

Pirates and privateers influenced early American colonial history from its beginning.  The original colonies depended on trade for survival.  For example, in Virginia, the first large colony, trade involved the sale of tobacco in exchange for virtually all manufactured goods.

Mercantilism ruled the day. European countries attempted to monopolize their trade for the benefit of home countries. Royal authorities licensed ships and shipowners had to pay a fee for the right to operate. English trade with Virginia was financed through a system of credit against the following year’s tobacco crop. Goods in both directions came on ships.

Trade required peace and is depicted in the cover image for my first historical novel, The Wealth of Jamestown.  The image is of a painting by Keith Rocco and is the property of the National Park Service.

Jamestown, 17th Century

 

Privateers, Pirates and Trade

Virginia prospered and grew, but for a good part of the seventeenth century England fought wars with European neighbors.  Sometimes the wars resulted in the shifting of ownership of various territories. Thus, New Amsterdam became New York in 1667 as a result of an Anglo Dutch War.  The Dutch won that war: they gave up a small settlement on the tip of Manhattan and received in its place the Spice Islands of Indonesia. They also won the right to sail ships up the James River to pick up tobacco, breaking the English monopoly on that trade.

European navies were small. During times of war, ships financed by the various crowns of Europe were supplemented by private vessels. Private merchant vessels received commissions and payments from the various governments. These privateers could conduct their business while acting in support of their kings and queens. The ships shown in the harbor in the painting were likely commercial ships owned by privateers. Depending on the year, they could have been owned by local Virginians.

Privateers armed their ships as law and order on the sea did not exist. Crews learned to operate cannons and could defend the ships if attacked.  They did so partly because of their status. The governments and peoples of the day valued and admired the privateers, as mother countries and colonies needed trade for their survival and prosperity.

French and Indian Wars, Privateers and Pirates

In Queen Anne’s war (1702-1712), the English defeated the French and annexed large parts of eastern Canada including Hudson Bay. This was the second of three French and Indian wars.

A peace treaty ended the conflict in 1713, but Queen Anne died in 1714. She was succeeded by George I, the first Hanover King of England. Because the war ended, privateers lost their commissions and the revenue that went with them. England once again paid for a very small royal navy.

The English government required privateers to pay license fees (taxes) in order to sail and conduct business. Some paid the fees; the ones who refused to pay the fees were called pirates.  With peace, trade expanded for all shippers, whether licensed or not. After 1714 pirates, who incurred lower costs than privateers, began to take over much of international trade. Privateers became pirates. They became a menace to their own mother countries.

The painting below, by Van de Welde the younger, shows the mother country’s ships (in this case Holland), fighting pirates:

War against Pirates

 

 

Blackbeard and the Return of Law and Order

In 1717 Blackbeard sailed a captured French warship known as the Concorde and renamed her the Queen Anne’s Revenge.  With this flagship and a fleet of about forty other ships, he blockaded Charleston harbor.  He became famous and his business thrived.

Authorities in London noticed . George I decided to beef up his navy.  He also issued a pardon called a “Proclamation for Suppressing Pirates”.  Under the King’s pardon the British Crown granted clemency to any pirate who surrendered to a governor of the colonies by September 5, 1718.

Blackbeard surrendered to the Governor of North Carolina and received an official royal pardon. As related in my book, Blackbeard’s Legacy, despite the proclamation from London, the Virginia House of Burgesses in November 1718 passed a law on “the apprehending and destroying of pirates.” With respect to Blackbeard, the House voted a reward of one hundred pounds, with ten pounds for each of his crew. The House, however, doubted their law’s legitimacy due to the king’s pardon, and refused to appropriate the reward money.

Spotswood, Blackbeard, the Courts and the Law

Spotswood disregarded the royal proclamation. At his personal expense he commissioned two sloops to find Blackbeard. He also appointed as commander of the force Lieutenant Robert Maynard. Maynard served  on HMS Pearl, a royal navy ship anchored at Jamestown.

In October 1718, Spotswood learned  that William Howard, Blackbeard’s former quarter master, had come to Williamsburg. The governor ordered a local justice of the peace to issue a warrant to detain Howard for trial. Soldiers arrested Howard, took fifty pounds from him, and arrested two black men who traveled with him. Fifty pounds in 1720  would be worth about $11,000 in today’s U. S. dollars.  That was a lot of money in those days. Armed guards took the three men onto the Pearl.

Spotswood wanted Howard tried in an admiralty court without a jury, but the Governor’s Council disagreed. The Governor’s Council, an appointed upper house of the Virginia General Assembly, called for normal legal order. The Council declared that Howard and his two companions should be provided the  normal course of law in civil court.  Spotswood was determined and disregarded the advice of the Council. He insisted that Howard be indicted for crimes of piracy on the high seas. Spotswood insisted that Howard be tried by a special three-man jury Spotswood would personally appoint.

How Not to Try a Pirate

Well known around Williamsburg, Howard had powerful friends. On their advice, he responded by hiring a lawyer, James Holloway. Holloway quickly caused the arrest of the justice of the peace who signed the warrant for Howard’s arrest. Subsequently, the civil court, following demands made by Holloway, issued warrants for the arrest of Captain George Gordon and Lieutenant Robert Maynard who’d detained Howard on the Pearl. Holloway, on behalf of Howard, sued Gordon and Maynard for five hundred pounds in damages.

Spotswood wanted to demonstrate he still exercised the powers of government. In a trial conducted by jurors appointed by Spotswood, Howard was found guilty and ordered hanged. However, on the day before the hanging, Spotswood received a number of notices from London. One was a commission ordering him to pardon all surrendering pirates for all acts of piracy committed before July 23, 1718.

Spotswood released Howard and his two companions, and returned Howard’s fifty pounds. In response, Howard promptly asked his lawyer to pursue his case for damages against the naval officers in civil court.

To sum up, the English Crown, Virginia’s legislative representatives, and the courts replaced the pirates and privateers and the governor as arbiters of justice.

Does all this sound familiar? Here, a legislature passed laws without funding them, while an executive disregarded current laws to enforce abrogated laws. Irate citizens (the pirates and privateers) sought justice and compensation in the courts. Three branches of government checking each other, almost a hundred years before the writing of the U.S. Constitution.

Blackbeard and the Use of Power

My book, Blackbeard’s Legacy, recounts a fictionalized story of Blackbeard, otherwise known as Edward Thatch or Teach. Set in the early 18th century, it presents a story of Blackbeard’s use of power, the people who knew him, and his business.  His eventual conflict with Governor Spotswood of Virginia forms the backdrop of the tale.

Blackbeard, a real person, commanded a fleet of over forty ships at the height of his power. He rivaled the navies of many countries of his day.  For example, he blockaded Charleston harbor and lifted that blockade in exchange for a chest of medicines.

Blackbeard knew what he was doing. He visited most major ports on the east coast and corresponded with governors and attorneys-general.  He had regular customers who paid for the goods he sold. There has never been evidence that he killed anyone.

Blackbeard was and still is genuinely popular. For example, he became captain by election by his crew. He was a popular commander, and seamen wanted to sail with him. Sailing with Blackbeard was safer and more profitable than sailing with weaker, lesser armed vessels..

Pirates are Popular

Blackbeard is known to everyone as a pirate. Museums up and down the east coast are dedicated to his story, especially about where he lived and how and where he died.  The towns of Bath, Beaufort, and Ocracoke in North Carolina are very proud of their connections to Blackbeard. There you can see coves where he anchored and houses in which he supposedly lived.

At a book signing about a year ago, people from North Carolina with family members named Teach came to see me.  They claimed to be relatives and descendants of Blackbeard and they were proud of the connection.

Why do people enjoy stories about pirates? A very old and rich literature depicts pirates as fiercely independent.  They’re described as violent people, maimed in many battles but surviving them. They have lost eyes and limbs, show deep scars, suffer bad teeth, and wear peg legs. In the literature they prey on women, hide treasure chests, and leave complex coded maps.  Little boys visiting the pirate museums love dressing up to the part: they wear eye patches, three-cornered hats, and shout “Aargh!!!” while waving little swords.

Young Pirate

Blackbeard’s Use of Power: Reality Check

A pirate, by definition, is a seaman operating outside of the law. During Blackbeard’s day, local governments insisted that ships entering their ports be certified. They required ship operators to obtain licenses or pardons for which they paid. With the pardon, they were privateers; without the pardons, they were considered pirates.  Accordingly, local governors collected fees from legal ship operators and shared in their profits.

In the eighteenth century, ships at sea had to fear larger better-armed ships wherever they went. On the sea, no law enforcement existed. The famous pirates who were caught and executed for crimes, for example Captain Kidd, were seized on land surreptitiously, not at sea.

Blackbeard’ use of power benefited his business. Whether or not he broke laws, he was very successful at what he did: he delivered goods to virtually every port at prices that people were happy to pay.

When he was assassinated in 1718 by hitmen hired by Governor Spotswood of Virginia, Blackbeard lived in North Carolina and held a legitimate royal pardon. Spotswood never consulted with the governor of North Carolina, disregarded Blackbeard’s pardon, and simply wanted a share of Blackbeard’s wealth. Who was the criminal then?

Have you heard of Spotswood? There’s a Spotsylvania County in Virginia and a golf course in Williamsburg that carries Spotswood’s name. In comparison, when Blackbeard died, he was a king of his day known virtually everywhere, and remains so. Benjamin Franklin in his autobiography mentions that he wrote poems about Teach when he began his newspaper writing career.

 

Blackbeard’s Popularity: His Flag

Blackbeard’s fleet of ships sailed under Blackbeard’s individual flag, easily recognized by many people in many locations. Today, we would call that marketing, and Blackbeard was clever at self-promotion.

From southeastern Virginia to Charleston there are numerous small museums devoted to Blackbeard.  The stories they tell are multiple, and they sell a flag that is supposed to be the one he sailed under:

Blackbeard’s Flag

 

 

Does this flag frighten you? The skeleton wears a crown, is shaking something like a large drink in one hand, while his arrow points at a heart that he’s not looking at. He’s also smiling; in fact, the whole skeleton seems to be shaking with laughter. Was Blackbeard a comedian?

Some stories say that Blackbeard had fourteen wives.  Others say his only wife was fourteen when they married.  Apparently if a tavern maid could claim to be Blackbeard’s wife, that claim was good for business. That may explain why he’s said to have so many wives!!!

 

Coronavirus and a Spring Sale

The coronavirus epidemic, coming in March, has coincided with the beginning of spring and my birthday. Certainly a memorable birthday, celebrated with a carryout dinner.

My husband and I have behaved according to the rules. We stay at home, away as much as possible from people and interesting places.  Every where I look, I’m told that’s what people like me and my husband are supposed to do. After all, we are the “vulnerable.”  I’ve spent a year being treated for lymphoma and my platelet count will never be normal again. My husband has a bad back and is nearly diabetic.

But I don’t feel vulnerable.  Every few days I venture out, at the correct time–7:00 am to the grocery store, late afternoon for a walk. I’ve been to the post office where tapes show people where to stand so they can be six feet apart. I’ve thought about golf which for some reason isn’t closed. I could take my putter to the golf practice range near us, but that would require a walk.  My knee and shoulder object to too much exercise, so I haven’t yet tried that.

I’ve had my fill of video games, bad television, and silly puzzles.  I’ve watched the Coronavirus Task Force about every other day, and I’m impressed with the doctors.  I worry about my son, who is a doctor, and call him every other day. He says his hospital in Ohio expects to be swamped in a few weeks, but so far they are able to handle new cases.

Spring

What to do? Spring has arrived! My daffodils, including some mysterious yellow crocus that have spread from my front yard to the woods across the street, are in full blossom. I cut a few every morning, while listening to the little birds chirping their hearts out. We’ve already seen chickadees, woodpeckers, gold finches, cardinals, mocking birds, and blue birds. I’ve also spotted a few eagles and ospreys. The little birds, tweeting very loudly, finish the feeder off every other day. Here is a picture of our feeder:

 

 

Poetry

The birds have inspired me, because they make me think of poetry.  How about a little poetry, to go with the new coronavirus? :

                “There was an old lady from Williamsburg

                                Who fell into her TV

                She stood next to Dr. Birx,

                                Wondering where the President might be.

                Sure enough, he entered and said,

                                “Welcome to the Task Force!”

                She replied, “I’m glad I’m not dead!”

                                He said, “Isn’t this Worse?”

 

What could be worse than falling into the television set and becoming a flashing image?  Maybe I’ll need to add some more to this.

Since this is spring, I’m happy to announce a discount on all of my ebooks. From now till the end of June all of my historical novels will be available in the ebook version at a 35 per cent discount. Order them from ipgbook.com and use the code BMSpring2020.

I hope all who get this are safe and healthy. Stay well and follow the guidelines.

Nation Building and Washington’s Shadow

Washington’s Shadow is my fourth historical novel and probably the last.  All of my books focus on  American nation building in our early history.  Generally early American history is not being taught in elementary schools and later grades.

I’ll be addressing the process by which I produce these books at a discussion panel at the Williamsburg Book Festival on Saturday, October 5. Nation building is a subject that has always interested me. Virtually everything I write discusses some aspect of it. The people who build the nation have to be strong enough to understand they can’t do everything alone, by themselves.  They have to risk danger in moving ahead, but they have to communicate with each other. They have to build coalitions and marriages.  Nations, in my way of thinking, always begin with families and extended families and how they learn to deal with individual members and each other.  Washington’s Shadow is about how Washington visualized the country and how the people who followed him interpreted the idea of nation building in his image.

 

I’ve spent a good part of my working life in and out of government jobs.  I’ve worked as staff in the US House of Representatives and  the US Senate. I held positions in the US Treasury Department, and the US Commerce Department. I worked for several  Washington law firms and lobbies. I know how our government is supposed to work.

When I retired and moved to Williamsburg, Virginia, I met many people from outside Washington DC. I was surprised by how little most people knew about the practical working origins of the US government.  More shocking was how little actual research had been done to explain and understand our history. There are very few serious books that explain the political institutions of the early colonies.  There are publications, fictional and non-fictional, about Pocahontas, colonists starving, and the exploits of famous pirates.  For the most part these are designed to entertain children and give little historical context.

What Americans Know About Nation Building and their History

On retirement I took a position as a volunteer docent in the museum at Jamestown Settlement. Jamestown as a city no longer exists.  Jamestown Settlement, a modern park, is situated near the James River. It includes a gallery,  a model fort, an Indian village, and a port holding three ships. The facility is designed to explain the founding and development of the first English settlement in the new world. I learned there that most people have heard of Pocahontas. However, many believe the three ships that arrived in Jamestown in 1607 were the Nina, the Pinta, and Santa Maria.  The next Virginian most people can identify is George Washington, who lived a hundred and fifty years later.

Visitors  coming to Williamsburg from Washington DC are often surprised by the familiarity of the old government buildings and institutions of colonial Virginia. Most people don’t know that Jefferson, who designed the US Capitol, previously served in Virginia’s House of Burgesses, as did George Washington. When they learn some facts, they begin to understand that our government didn’t somehow fall out of the sky. The American government was the product of long experience and practice.  The US Constitution was written by people who knew what they were trying to do.

Nation Building and the Founding Fathers? Who Built the Nation?

The Wealth of Jamestown, The Wealth of Virginia, and Blackbeard’s Legacy are three short novels to the early 1700s. The books describe men and women, young and old, native Americans and settlers, the educated and the uneducated living  almost a hundred years before the US Declaration of Independence. The characters are not European; they are American. They are engaged in politics and commerce on a grand scale.  Blackbeard, the king of international trade in his day, was as much a Founding Father as Thomas Jefferson. Each of these books required at least two year’s research into original documents and obscure writings and sources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Washington’s Shadow tells of people living at the edge of a wilderness in a time soon after the Revolutionary War. These people knew Washington. They are a later generation of Americans. They moved west to build towns and communities. They faced away from Europe with its wars and dynasties, a movement of people that began in 1607.  Though taking place in 1810, Washington’s Shadow is the latest chapter in my fictional explanation of nation-building, American style.